Langevin Blog

Dispelling the Top 5 Training Myths

March 12th, 2012

If you listen to non-training people in the workplace talk about training, you will hear a variety of opinions and perceptions – some good and some way off the mark. Training professionals need to work hard to dispel the many myths about training.

As such, here are the top five training myths I’d like to dispel:

  1. “Anyone can train.” I hear this all the time. People think that if you know the content you can train it. Not so! Think of all the classroom management skills required. Managing group dynamics, leading discussions, asking and answering questions, giving feedback; the list of skills required goes on and on.
  2. “It’s easy to convert instructor-led training (ILT) to web-based training (WBT).” Putting a paper-based course manual and PowerPoint slides on the company’s intranet does not make WBT. Much consideration must be paid to the online instructional methods and media as well as the level of interactivity. It is not easy!
  3. “Converting ILT to WBT will cost instructor jobs.” It shouldn’t. Live virtual classrooms have to be facilitated and online discussion boards and other asynchronous strategies have to be monitored. If we are converting ILT to WBT following a logical process, we still need real, live instructors.
  4. “Excessive amounts of course content can be covered by having learners work through lunch and stay late.” Uh, no! There is only so much information that people can absorb. I’ve actually found that people retain less when we pack too much into a session. Let’s focus on the high priority tasks. I would rather teach half of the content really well than teach all of it half as well.
  5. “Training is money out the door.” I’m sure some ineffective training is, but good training isn’t. If a TNA (training needs analysis) is done, the training is well designed and delivered, and we can show the impact of training on the job, then we can show value. Training professionals need to walk the walk and talk the talk.

So, there are my top five myths. As training professionals, what are the training myths that you want to dispel – and what are you doing to dispel them?

Steve









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